Jason Travis photographed me and everything in my bag for his Persona series. Hiiii.

Jason Travis photographed me and everything in my bag for his Persona series. Hiiii.

Happy 10th Anniversary, Feministing!

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Feministing, which celebrates its tenth birthday today, was my first home on the internet, the first place my byline routinely appeared. After I graduated from years of objectivity-indoctrination at journalism school, this blog was a space where I learned that my ideas and opinions matter. It also thickened my skin considerably. (Blogging at a site with the word “feminist” in the name really set a high bar for negative feedback. Everything since has been a lovefest by comparison.) 

In many ways, it was my first real editorial experience. Then as now, the site was run by a low-paid (or, more often, unpaid) editorial collective. Figuring out which news and opinions were a good fit for Feministing was experience I translated to the magazines where I later worked. I know it’s not 2004 anymore—things have changed a lot, and it’s harder to make a name for yourself by simply starting a blog. But I still tell young journalists that if they can’t score the types of assignments they want just yet, they should get together with their peers and make something that fills a void in the media landscape. I have zero regrets.

Since then, Feministing has evolved in some really important ways. Click here to find out more about the current editorial collective and support the awesome work they continue to do.

"Their biographies share much in common with more venerated media darlings. Most began their careers with stints at major newspapers, cable news outlets, or magazines before securing funding to start their own innovative media companies. The only difference is they haven’t showed up in many media-entrepreneurship trend stories—yet."

16 women whose digital startups deserve Vox-level plaudits - CJR.org

In the past few years we’ve seen more shows and movies featuring female fuckups, from Young Adult to Girls to Bachelorette. But usually, these women are embarrassed by their failure to get it together, and their insecurities spill over to poison their friendships and romantic relationships alike. By contrast, the women of Broad City exhibit very real imperfections without the self-loathing. This strikes me as a huge step forward. Abbi and Ilana don’t just reject the exacting standards most women feel they have to live up to, they still feel great about themselves. And their self-esteem is probably directly attributable to their unflinching support of each other and the pleasure they take in each other’s company.
The genius of Broad City - The Guardian

In the past few years we’ve seen more shows and movies featuring female fuckups, from Young Adult to Girls to Bachelorette. But usually, these women are embarrassed by their failure to get it together, and their insecurities spill over to poison their friendships and romantic relationships alike. By contrast, the women of Broad City exhibit very real imperfections without the self-loathing. This strikes me as a huge step forward. Abbi and Ilana don’t just reject the exacting standards most women feel they have to live up to, they still feel great about themselves. And their self-esteem is probably directly attributable to their unflinching support of each other and the pleasure they take in each other’s company.

The genius of Broad City - The Guardian

This morning I spoke to the fine folks at MailChimp/TinyLetter about dominating your haters. Just LOOK at this incredible poster they made me! Now I just need to animate it so I am walking/whistling.

This morning I spoke to the fine folks at MailChimp/TinyLetter about dominating your haters. Just LOOK at this incredible poster they made me! Now I just need to animate it so I am walking/whistling.

"As job searches expand to “wherever I can find one” (including, apparently, Mars), the normally low-simmering tension between work and relationships is increasingly distilled to a single big decision: Should I move away from my partner to take this great job opportunity? Ask him or her to take a leap and come with me? Or — for the partners on the flip side — should I uproot my life and follow? With employment prospects for twentysomethings in short supply and more couples delaying marriage, people are facing this dilemma at a younger age, usually before they’ve made a legal commitment to one another. In fact, the decision to pack up and leave together could probably even be considered a new relationship milestone, falling somewhere between “cohabitation” and “engagement” on the seriousness scale."

Moving for Love: The Modern Relationship Milestone - NYmag.com

thisisgretchenjones:

This is how I fly. Lubed up and ready to read. #justsayin (at almost a mile high club)

She’s enjoying a solitary drink while reading the issue that contains my essay about drinking alone! Beautiful. (Nice mani, too.)

thisisgretchenjones:

This is how I fly. Lubed up and ready to read. #justsayin (at almost a mile high club)

She’s enjoying a solitary drink while reading the issue that contains my essay about drinking alone! Beautiful. (Nice mani, too.)

The public reaction to coming-out stories like Tom Daley’s is one way we signal to bisexual men — small percentage though they may be — whether their identities are acceptable. I don’t think coming-out pronouncements should be followed by a sexual-identity polygraph test administered by the media to figure out whether a person is actually bi or truly gay. I’m for letting people call themselves what they want to call themselves. Sullivan wrote at the time, “Daley will never have a sexual relationship with a woman again, because his assertion that he still fancies girls is a classic bridging mechanism to ease the transition to his real sexual identity.” I don’t doubt that many men have used bisexuality as a bridging technique as they come to fully inhabit their identities as gay men. But I also don’t presume to know what’s in Tom Daley’s head, then or now.
Let People Coming Out Choose Their Labels Themselves - NYmag.com

The public reaction to coming-out stories like Tom Daley’s is one way we signal to bisexual men — small percentage though they may be — whether their identities are acceptable. I don’t think coming-out pronouncements should be followed by a sexual-identity polygraph test administered by the media to figure out whether a person is actually bi or truly gay. I’m for letting people call themselves what they want to call themselves. Sullivan wrote at the time, “Daley will never have a sexual relationship with a woman again, because his assertion that he still fancies girls is a classic bridging mechanism to ease the transition to his real sexual identity.” I don’t doubt that many men have used bisexuality as a bridging technique as they come to fully inhabit their identities as gay men. But I also don’t presume to know what’s in Tom Daley’s head, then or now.

Let People Coming Out Choose Their Labels Themselves - NYmag.com

Sorry, friends, this image is now my default reply to 90% of your emails.

Sorry, friends, this image is now my default reply to 90% of your emails.

"The overall effect is that of the bromantic comedy “Entourage,” another show that made me feel real affection for men who display clueless privilege and casual sexism, only relocated 350 miles north. Something about seeing self-involved actors get their feelings hurt and go out on a limb for their buddies—not to mention the peek into an industry that dramatically shapes our culture—gave “Entourage” an appeal that extended beyond the Hollywood swagger on its surface. The show laid bare the fragile male ego in such a heartfelt way that I could finally relate to a type of guy who’d always made me cringe. Or at least an HBO version of him. The same is true for the bros of “Silicon Valley.”"

HBO’s ‘Silicon Valley’ Is a Cynical Show with a Gooey Center - The New Republic