"In only acting now that the security-camera footage is public, the NFL is setting a disgusting standard. It’s communicating to survivors — and the rest of us — that their testimony is not enough. Their broken bones are not enough. Guilty verdicts are not enough. Anything short of a public spectacle is not enough to make the league and the media sit up and say that assault and abuse are unacceptable. The tacit request is that survivors get comfortable with re-victimization if they want justice. The reaction to the “ELEVATOR KNOCKOUT” video doesn’t prove that the NFL is finally getting tough on domestic abusers. It just confirms survivors’ nagging suspicion that, without a viral video as evidence, it’s not really abuse. It’s just “an incident.”"

The NFL’s Disgusting Message to Abused Women - NYmag.com

me irl

me irl

(Source: jezebel.com)

This warning just came up when I bought a pair of ankle boots online. I hope I like them so much that I’m tempted to mouth ‘em.

This warning just came up when I bought a pair of ankle boots online. I hope I like them so much that I’m tempted to mouth ‘em.

I wrote a little rumination on 6 a.m. in Los Angeles for the new issue of COS Magazine. 
I came back to LA last night after five months away. Throughout the summer, many people (cough*europeans*cough) who have only visited LA briefly— or never been here at all—told me that they’ve never really *gotten* Los Angeles. I found myself explaining why I like it here. A lot. I briefly mentioned things like the weather and the abundant produce and the legal marijuana and my incredible bungalow. I did some mythbusting and explained that no, I do not drive everywhere.
Mostly, though, I talked about my friends and acquaintances here, who all have so many creative projects and career side-tracks going on that they are impossible to describe without using slashes. Like, “she’s an animator/creative director/sculptor/graphic designer.” (For real, that’s my friend Kenesha.) To traditionalists, a slash-ridden professional bio is a sign of someone who is unable to commit to a single career, or maybe someone who’s dabbling in everything because they’re good at nothing. But I find slash-career types to be the best people to surround yourself with if you don’t want to get stuck in a personal or professional rut. People who move between worlds have a sense of perspective. And because everyone is doing a different combination of creative things, the tendency is to work together rather than compete against each other. (I know this doesn’t fit with the cutthroat-entertainment-biz LA stereotype—but hey, that’s not my LA.) 
In particular, it’s a great place to be a freelance writer. Many of these slash-career friends, like me,  have an unpredictable work schedule. Which means I often send them texts that say, “are you working this week?” Sometimes they’re working through the weekend and around the clock to meet a deadline. But if they’re not, we can go thrifting in the valley together. Or hiking in Griffith Park. Or to the beach. In the middle of the week.
Also, burritos. LA has great burritos. But you knew that.

I wrote a little rumination on 6 a.m. in Los Angeles for the new issue of COS Magazine. 

I came back to LA last night after five months away. Throughout the summer, many people (cough*europeans*cough) who have only visited LA briefly— or never been here at all—told me that they’ve never really *gotten* Los Angeles. I found myself explaining why I like it here. A lot. I briefly mentioned things like the weather and the abundant produce and the legal marijuana and my incredible bungalow. I did some mythbusting and explained that no, I do not drive everywhere.

Mostly, though, I talked about my friends and acquaintances here, who all have so many creative projects and career side-tracks going on that they are impossible to describe without using slashes. Like, “she’s an animator/creative director/sculptor/graphic designer.” (For real, that’s my friend Kenesha.) To traditionalists, a slash-ridden professional bio is a sign of someone who is unable to commit to a single career, or maybe someone who’s dabbling in everything because they’re good at nothing. But I find slash-career types to be the best people to surround yourself with if you don’t want to get stuck in a personal or professional rut. People who move between worlds have a sense of perspective. And because everyone is doing a different combination of creative things, the tendency is to work together rather than compete against each other. (I know this doesn’t fit with the cutthroat-entertainment-biz LA stereotype—but hey, that’s not my LA.)

In particular, it’s a great place to be a freelance writer. Many of these slash-career friends, like me,  have an unpredictable work schedule. Which means I often send them texts that say, “are you working this week?” Sometimes they’re working through the weekend and around the clock to meet a deadline. But if they’re not, we can go thrifting in the valley together. Or hiking in Griffith Park. Or to the beach. In the middle of the week.

Also, burritos. LA has great burritos. But you knew that.

I interviewed Robyn for the latest issue of The Gentlewoman!
As in, we hung out backstage and drank beer in her trailer after I watched her headline a massive music festival in England. As in, we had weekday brunch and talked for hours about men who have a problem with the term “feminism” and how she thinks about her body when she’s onstage and the downsides of being a role model. As in, we got tipsy. We took selfies. I fangirled so hard, and she was very cool about it. She said she didn’t want to presume that Call Your Girlfriend was a reference to her song. The result is my first-ever cover story.
I also interviewed Kristen Wiig for this issue. I mean, what?
It’s the autumn/winter issue, and it’s available in the UK on Sept 4 and in the US a few weeks after that. Pick one up.

I interviewed Robyn for the latest issue of The Gentlewoman!

As in, we hung out backstage and drank beer in her trailer after I watched her headline a massive music festival in England. As in, we had weekday brunch and talked for hours about men who have a problem with the term “feminism” and how she thinks about her body when she’s onstage and the downsides of being a role model. As in, we got tipsy. We took selfies. I fangirled so hard, and she was very cool about it. She said she didn’t want to presume that Call Your Girlfriend was a reference to her song. The result is my first-ever cover story.

I also interviewed Kristen Wiig for this issue. I mean, what?

It’s the autumn/winter issue, and it’s available in the UK on Sept 4 and in the US a few weeks after that. Pick one up.

"If you’ve ever gone to Facebook to, say, check whether it’s a friend’s birthday and found yourself, 45 minutes later, on your third BuzzFeed quiz, then you have been “pushed.” You did not actively choose to spend your lunch break finding out which Star Wars character you are. You just sort of . . . ended up there. Everywhere—but especially online—humans are not rational actors. And algorithms can see right through us. In a questionnaire, you might tell Match.com that you’re open to dating people of all races and body types, but if you only click on skinny blondes, the site will serve you more skinny blondes. You might add a dozen highbrow documentaries to your Netflix queue, but if you only watch gross-out comedies, it’s going to recommend Anchorman 2 over the latest from Errol Morris. “Who knows why people do what they do?” asked former Wired editor Chris Anderson. “The point is they do it, and we can track and measure it with unprecedented fidelity.” But for journalists, even those who care about clickability and search optimization, the “why” matters."

How to build an audience - Columbia Journalism Review

Episode 7: Follow Your Arrow

cygfriend:

In a special listener mailbag edition, we answer questions about starting a long-distance friendship, women who are mansplainers, a Shine Theory dilemma, work self vs. internet self, an office style conundrum, and why iPhone read receipts are terrible.
Subscribe via iTunes. And if you have a question you want us to answer, you can email us or tweet at us.

"How does it feel to be a sex symbol in a band?"

"I don’t know— ask Stevie Nicks."

“I feel like I know where I’m going now, and I want to enjoy this.” 
I interviewed Christine McVie about her return to Fleetwood Mac.

“I feel like I know where I’m going now, and I want to enjoy this.” 

I interviewed Christine McVie about her return to Fleetwood Mac.